12 Comments
Dec 31, 2023Liked by Shane Rosenthal

Shane, Thank you for sharing this very interesting and illustrative personal story. I had originally read and enjoyed the transcript a few months ago, so it was a pleasure to listen to your very nicely produced podcast this time and to hear it in your voice as well as your mother's and father's voices. The story really is a great example of the necessity of an open mind, and of the tenacity and discernment required to discover and verify the truth in this fallen world.

I experienced a somewhat similar situation researching my father's WWII experience while in the process of compiling the details of his experience and his letters into a book for the family. In late January of 1945, Georgetown University's greatest athlete and well-known member of the NY Giants football team, Al Blozis, had arrived fresh from the States through the replacement pipeline as the new lieutenant of one of the platoons in the rifle company my father served in. Blozis arrived the night before their company embarked on a combat mission in France's Vosges Mountains. He was mortally wounded the next day and slowly died before they were finally in a position to evacuate him three days later.

I had first person accounts of this tragedy from my father (a sergeant in the company HQs platoon), his good friend who was a member of Blozis's platoon, and their rifle company's commanding officer. I discovered a great deal of misinformation at Wikipedia and Georgetown University, as well as several other accounts including a book authored by a member of one of the regiment's sister companies. Some of the misinformation took on mythical proportions, perhaps in an attempt to make his very humble death into something that more closely matched the athletic accomplishments that had brought him fame.

In an attempt to correct the record with some of the sources I was surprised that nobody was interested in making any corrections. They were very invested in "their truth" even when confronted with solid evidence to the contrary. Just as your story illustrated, it was a valuable lesson for me in many ways!

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Is it possible to download a mp3 file?

Thanks,

Cliff

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Shane,

Great podcast (and great father!).

You may recall that (the late) Peter Berger (in A Rumor of Angels) said that the plausibility structures of modernity militate against religion not because of science, but because of too many options; as travel and communication media developed, we rubbed shoulders with so many different people that it became implausible to believe that some might be right and others wrong. Berger, and the sociology of knowledge itself, is a great ally for intelligent Christian apologists such as yourself.

T. David Gordon

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Oct 10, 2022Liked by Shane Rosenthal

Great start (Bluefield, that is 😉)! I'll definitely continue to tune in.

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Oct 10, 2022Liked by Shane Rosenthal

Excellent content and mannerism of making a specific point through the use of a real life story. Thoroughly enjoyed this podcast. I can relate much better when a speaker uses stories to make the objective of the subject at hand understandable. Great Job!!

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Oct 6, 2022Liked by Shane Rosenthal

First-class production and content. No doubt it will continue to be very intriguing and edifying!

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founding

This really was remarkably good. I eagerly followed the investigation of the Piano Man and was amazed at the detailed research it took to prove a simple fact about your dad's experience with Billy Joel. Such a clever way to paint a picture of a search for truth. I loved your approach at the White Horse Inn and am really looking forward to your future episodes at The Humble Skeptic.

Al Jones

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Oct 5, 2022Liked by Shane Rosenthal

Great show, Shane ...

Just read this from the pen of Richard Baxter: 'A young Christian should be careful not to be too confident concerning their first understanding of difficult questions where Scripture is not very plain. Hold them modestly with due suspicion, being open to further investigation, supposing it is possible, or probable upon better instruction, evidence, and maturity, that you may, in such things, change your mind!'

I think this dovetails nicely with your intent with 'The Humble Skeptic,' don't you think?

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Oct 4, 2022Liked by Shane Rosenthal

What a magnificent start to what hopefully will be a permanent and ongoing podcast. While I have missed your moderation of the White Horse Inn, this podcast will be even better no doubt based on listening to your first episode. Thank you Shane!

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Oct 4, 2022Liked by Shane Rosenthal

Great presentation! You really did your homework so I know you will dig deep into Scriptural authenticity. Your deep dig into Piano Man brought back many memories. I bought one of those albums where he sounds like a chipmunk! Thanks for a well-presented argument. I look forward to more of the same in future podcasts.

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